Electric Blues Night feat. Eli Cook

Pearl Street Warehouse Presents

Electric Blues Night feat. Eli Cook

Kathryn Rheault

Fri · August 3, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:15 pm

$15.00

This event is 21 and over

This show is G.A.

Seating is limited and first come first serve.

Tables are meant to be shared.

Electric Blues Night feat. Eli Cook
Electric Blues Night feat. Eli Cook
“Everybody knows the story of the crossroads, where blues guitarists go at midnight to trade their souls to the devil for musical prowess. It’s just a myth, of course, but if it were true, firebrand EliCook could have bragging rights, as his scarifying solo-country blues chill like a hellhound on your trail.”

– Guitar Player (2007)

Coming from Albemarle County in Virginia at the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Eli Cook grew up listening to the blues, country, classic rock and alternative rock. He grew up with no TV and radio shows like Prairie Home Companion were his Saturday night entertainment. Life moves slowly in this rural area of the world giving him time to hone his skills with his voice and guitar chops. At 18 he was opening for B.B. King – a few years later he's playing in Canada – and then the next week he’s blending in with his hometown locals.

Produced by Eli Cook at Full Moon Recording Studios in VA, High-Dollar Gospel opens up with a slow bang with “Trouble Maker” – taunting and questioning his muse to join him. Acoustic picking and slide drive the classic hoedown backs the cautionary tale “The Devil Finds Work.” The haunting “Mixing My Medicine” contains the cavernous sound of a detuned custom 12-string guitar; an instrument played famously by Leadbelly and Blind Willie McTell. Cook slows down Muddy Waters’ melancholy “Can’t Lose What You Ain’t Never Had” into a terrifying, heart of darkness lament, his voice reaching a bottomless depth of sorrow. The orchestral 12-string guitar underscores the metaphoric boast of “King Of The Mountain” that shows off Eli’s huge growl of a voice with its anthem-like chorus is a showstopper.

Eli Cook explains his album title as “I was brainstorming ideas that would evoke the imagery of the American South. The phrase ‘high-dollar’ is an old one, and ‘gospel’ is the Southern church music that brought us Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, Sister Rosetta Tharpe and countless other iconic musicians. The two phrases together can have several connotations, but the one I think of is the feeling of disillusionment that seems to be more and more pervasive. I think a lot of young people feel a sense of apathy and a loss in direction, generally speaking. People need inspiration, and it seems like that is becoming harder to come by.”

The growl in his voice shows off an emotional connection to the music as a tool rather than decoration, and with your eyes closed, you could be listening to Howlin’ Wolf or Chris Cornell. On High-Dollar Gospel, Eli shows you what you can’t imagine, something so strong and melodic, so don’t be afraid to look and listen.
Kathryn Rheault
Kathryn Rheault
After a zealous pursuit of the world of musical theatre, Kathryn took a job at the Birchmere music hall and, inspired by what she heard, began her journey into songwriting. “I had been living through the stories of great, exciting characters and wanted live and write my own." She still loves acting and hopes to incorporate theatrical elements while also delving into the subconscious and frame arresting aspects of modern cultural crises into her songwriting.
You can find her home recordings online at soundcloud.com/krowren and her EP is expected Fall 2018.
Venue Information:
Pearl Street Warehouse
33 Pearl St SW
Washington, DC, 20024
http://www.pearlstreetwarehouse.com/